Image Development and Design Strategies

The visual arts involve the use of image sources and image-development and design strategies to transform ideas and experiences into visual images. (Note that “image” is used to describe all visual forms, both 2-D and 3-D.) Image sources provide the inspiration for the creation of an artwork. Image sources include:

• emotions and feelings

• ideas and concepts

• imagination

• memories

• observation

• other sensory experiences.

Image-development strategies are the processes used to transform these ideas and experiences in a particular way for particular effects. Image-development strategies include:

distortion—misrepresenting and pulling out of shape any part of an image
elaboration—embellishing or adding detail to part or all of an image
exaggeration—over-emphasizing or intensifying a portion or aspect of an image
fragmentation—detaching, isolating, or breaking up part or all of an image
juxtaposition—placing like or contrasting images or elements side-by-side in a way that changes the meaning or effect of each
magnification—increasing the apparent size of some or all of the elements in an image
metamorphosis—changing an image from one form to another
minification—decreasing the apparent size of an image
multiplication—reiterating or restating part or all of an image
personification—giving human characteristics to nonhuman forms
point of view—positioning the viewer physically relative to the created image
reversal—turning inside out, inverting, transposing, or converting to the opposite an effect in all or a portion of an image
rotation—revolving, moving, or rearranging an image or parts of an image
serialization—repeating multiple variations of an image in connection with each other
simplification—making an image less complex by the elimination of details.

(Source: http://www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/pdfs/arts_education/2002visualarts1112_artfoundstudioarts.pdf)

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